Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Analysis of "If You Are What You Eat, Then What Am I?" by Geeta Kothari

Geeta Kothari, a two-time recipient of the fellowship in literature from the Pennsylvania Council on the arts, wrote the essay "If You Are What You Eat, Then What Am I?". This essay was first published in the Kenyon Review in 1999 and was selected for the Best American Essays 2000. In the essay, Kothari describes her relationship with her parents and differentiates between their choices and likes in food. She worries whether she is her parents daughter or not. She is concerned because she feels she is nothing like her parents since they have different food choices and she wants to try the American way. She goes on to believe she truly is her parents daughter. In the end, she realizes she doesn't like American food like she thought she would. Like her parents, she expects knowledge to pass down from her to her husband without translation. Kothari characterizes American food as "meaty". She enjoys American food because it is what her peers eat and it is meaty and protein filled. She dislikes American food though because it is unhealthy and she just cant get used to it. Kothari's husband is described as a meat lover. When Kothari looks into his freezer/refrigerator, she finds everything to be used with meat if not meat itself, such as chili. Husband and wife may differ from one another in their choice of foods. That choice can affect their relationship. Kothari doesn't like how the foods her husband eats gives a musky smell.

Answers to questions on "If You Are What You Eat, Then What Am I?"

Geeta Kothari, a two-time recipient of the fellowship in literature from the Pennsylvania Council on the arts, wrote the essay "If You Are What You Eat, Then What Am I?". This essay was first published in the Kenyon Review in 1999 and was selected for the Best American Essays 2000. In the essay, Kothari describes her relationship with her parents and differentiates between their choices and likes in food. She worries whether she is her parents daughter or not. She is concerned because she feels she is nothing like her parents since they have different food choices and that she thrives on thee American way of food, rather than her parents ways and traditions. She goes on to believe she truly is her parents daughter. Like her parents, she expects knowledge to pass down from her to her husband without translation. Kothari characterizes American food as "meaty". She enjoys American food because it is what her peers eat and it is meaty and protein filled as she likes. She dislikes American food though because it is unhealthy. Kothari's husband is described as a meat lover. When Kothari looks into his freezer/refrigerator, she finds everything to be used with meat if not meat itself, such as chili. Husband and wife may differ from one another in their choice of foods. That choice can affect their relationship. Kothari doesn't like how the foods her husband eats gives a musky smell.